Join the Family

Sign up now to receive the latest news, information and updates on Matt.

spotify clean.png
  • Apple Music Social Icon
  • Black Google Play Icon
  • Black Amazon Icon
Management & BOOKING

Ray Edwards Retires

Long time friend, musician and original HonkyTonk Outlaw, Ray Edwards has announced his retirement. A long time staple and founder of the HonkyTonk Outlaw sound has decided to pack up his banjo and steel guitar and enjoy his retirement closer to family and friends. 

Two time world banjo champion and one of the most prolific melody writers in bluegrass music, he was a member of the High Country Boys (from 1970 to 1973), Southbound (1973-1974), Jeanie C. Riley’s Red River Symphony (1975-1978), Tom T Hall’s Storytellers (1978–1983) and singer, songwriter and actor Ed Bruce’s Tennessee Cowboy Band (1984-2004).  He also worked with Randy Travis, Sammy Kershaw, Lynn Anderson and Cliff Waldron & the New Shades of Grass. Edwards was a staff musician on Tom T. Hall’s Pop Goes The Country Club for three seasons (1980-1982) playing steel guitar, rhythm guitar, banjo, Dobro® and mandolin. Some of the highlights playing with Tom T. included the Grand Ole Opry, Carnegie Hall, The Smithsonian Institute and playing at The White House for former President Jimmy Carter.

His song-writing highlights are having co-written Hard Rock Mountain Prison (‘Til I Die) and Carolina Moonshine Man, which were nominated by the IBMA and SPBGMA for Bluegrass Song of the Year. He formed his own publishing company, the rapidly expanding Silver Stirrup Music, in 1980.

Lead singer, Matt Dylan said "While we understand Ray wanting to come off the road after a long and storied career, we will forever cherish his contributions to “Most Wanted” and “The HonkyTonk Outlaws”. Ray’s steel and banjo were integral parts of the sound that molded who we are. I know Ray’s daughter and grandchildren will enjoy seeing their “Pawpaw” more often, and we are happy for them. On behalf of the band we wish you, Wanda and Jim the best on the move to Alabama." "Congratulations on an amazing career that has spawned many decades of great work. I am thankful to be just a small part of that," concluded Dylan.